Obama’s Inauguration Photos: Have I Missed Something?

It’s not that I am a big fan of U.S. President Barack Obama, but today my wife and I were discussing him taking the oath of office. Why? One evening this week I was reading an article online which mentioned Obama did not use the word God in his oath. I didn’t watch the inauguration, either time, so I really did not know. There was an audio of Obama taking the oath and I didn’t hear him say God: I wish I could find the link again. I didn’t think anymore about it until today when I heard that the United States Air Force is allowing the word God to be removed from their oath.

This evening I was rummaging around on Youtube.com and watched several videos of both of Barack Obama’s inaugurations and him taking the oath of office. He did use the word God in both instances. In fact, he had his hand on a Bible as well during both events. However, I ran across something odd too. In a picture I found on Wikipedia.org, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administers the oath of office a second time with Barack Obamathe caption read, “To avoid any constitutional problems, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administers the oath of office a second time with Barack Obama in the Map Room of the White House on Wednesday, January 21, 2009.”  It also stated, “This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made as part of that person’s official duties.” In this photo Obama has his right hand raised, but he clearly has his left hand at his side. I understand the reasoning behind giving the oath a second time after the inauguration just to be sure there are no conflicts with the Constitution, but if this is the reason, is not using the Bible in this version of taking the oath of office any less important? It would seem to me that it would be just as important. What do you think?

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One thought on “Obama’s Inauguration Photos: Have I Missed Something?

  1. Article VI, paragraph 3 of the United States Constitution

    The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.

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