Should Maxine Waters be Charged with Inciting Riots and Disruption of Government Function?

The recent event of Maxine Waters Maxine Waterstelling a group of people, “if you see anybody from that (Donald Trump’s) cabinet in a restaurant, in a department store, at a gasoline station, you get out and you create a crowd. And you push back on them. And you tell them they’re not welcome anymore, anywhere.”

This statement in my opinion should absolutely be considered an act of
threatening government officials of the United States and their families and Maxine Waters should definitley be charge with such since she has shown intent publicly to disruption the government function; and the possibility of inciting others to violence.

(Source: Wikipedia) Threatening government officials of the United States is a felony under federal lawThreatening the President of the United States is a felony under 18 U.S.C. § 871, punishable by up to 5 years of imprisonment, that is investigated by the United States Secret Service. Threatening other officials is a Class C or D felony, usually carrying maximum penalties of 5 or 10 years under 18 U.S.C. § 87518 U.S.C. § 876 and other statutes, that is investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Threatening federal officials’ family members is also a federal crime; in enacting the law, the Committee on the Judiciary stated that “Clearly it is a proper Federal function to respond to terrorists and other criminals who seek to influence the making of Federal policies and interfere with the administration of justice by attacking close relatives of those entrusted with these tasks.”[3]

United States Sentencing Guidelines take a number of factors into consideration in determining the recommended penalty, including evidence of the person’s intent to carry out the threat; disruption to the government function; and the possibility of inciting others to violence.[6] There is also a 6-level official victim enhancement, which makes the recommended penalty, per the sentencing table, approximately double that which would apply if an ordinary citizen were the victim.[7] There can be many motives for making threats, including political motives or a desire to frame someone else for making the threat.[8] The person’s intent can greatly affect the sentence.

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